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* [http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=csr&CScn=&CScntry=4&CSst=44&CScnty=2419 Findagrave.com]
 
* [http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=csr&CScn=&CScntry=4&CSst=44&CScnty=2419 Findagrave.com]
 
* [https://billiongraves.com/search/results?year_range=5&action=search_cemetery&exact=true&country=United%20States&state=South%20Dakota&county=Tripp&cemetery_name=a# Billion Graves]
 
* [https://billiongraves.com/search/results?year_range=5&action=search_cemetery&exact=true&country=United%20States&state=South%20Dakota&county=Tripp&cemetery_name=a# Billion Graves]
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*[http://apps.sd.gov/applications/DT58Cemetery/ SD Cemetery Record Search]
 
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| colspan="2" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" style="border:1px solid black"| <center>See '''[[South Dakota Cemeteries]]''' for more information</center>
 
| colspan="2" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" style="border:1px solid black"| <center>See '''[[South Dakota Cemeteries]]''' for more information</center>

Revision as of 14:42, 17 February 2017

United StatesGotoarrow.png South Dakota Gotoarrow.png Tripp County

Guide to Tripp County, South Dakota ancestry, genealogy and family history, birth records, marriage records, death records, census records, family history, and military records.

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County Facts
County seat: Winner
Organized: January 8, 1873
Parent County(s): Gregory and Todd(old) and unorganized territory[1]
Neighboring Counties
Cherry (NE)  • Gregory  • Keya Paha (NE)  • Lyman  • Mellette  • Todd
See County Maps
Courthouse
SouthDakotaTrippCourthouse.jpg
Location Map
SD-tripp.png
Adoption
Adopt-a-wiki page
Sdgwlogo2.gif This page adopted by:
SDGenWeb Project
who welcome you to contribute.
and its representative
Tripp Co. SDGenWeb
Adopt a page today


County Information[edit | edit source]

Description[edit | edit source]

The county was named after lawyer, judge, and diplomat Bartlett Tripp. It's county seat is Winner. It was organized 1909. It is located in the South-Central section of the state.[2]

County Courthouse[edit | edit source]

Tripp County Courthouse
200 East 3rd Street
Winner, SD 57580
Phone 605.842.2266

Register of Deeds has birth records from 1909, burial records from 1941 and land records;
County Treasurer has marriage records from 1909;
Clerk Court has divorce, probate and court records from 1912[3]

Tripp County, South Dakota Record Dates[edit | edit source]

Beginning Dates for Major County Records
Birth* Marriage Death* Court Land Probate Census
1910

Record Loss[edit | edit source]

There is no known history of courthouse disasters in this county.

Boundary Changes[edit | edit source]

  • 1873--Tripp County was created 8 January 1873 from Gregory and Todd(old) Counties and unorganized territory.
  • County seat: Winner, SD 57580; Tripp County Courthouse[1]

Populated Places[edit | edit source]

The following are locations in the county[4]

Cities
Towns
Unincorporated communities
Census-designated places
Townships
  • Banner
  • Beaver Creek
  • Black
  • Brunson
  • Bull Creek
  • Carter
  • Colome
  • Condon
  • Curlew
  • Dog Ear
  • Elliston
  • Greenwood
  • Holsclaw
  • Huggins
  • Ideal
  • Irwin
  • Jordan
  • Keyapaha
  • King
  • Lake
  • Lamro
  • Lincoln
  • Lone Star
  • Lone Tree
  • McNeely
  • Millboro
  • Pahapesto
  • Plainview
  • Pleasant Valley
  • Pleasant View
  • Progressive
  • Rames
  • Rosedale
  • Roseland
  • Star Prairie
  • Star Valley
  • Stewart
  • Sully
  • Taylor
  • Valley
  • Weave
  • Willow Creek
  • Wilson
  • Witten
  • Wortman
  • Wright
Unorganized territories
  • Gassman


Resources[edit | edit source]

Bible Records[edit | edit source]

Biographies[edit | edit source]

Business, Commerce, and Occupations[edit | edit source]

Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

Cemeteries of Tripp County, South Dakota online and in print
Tombstone Transcriptions Online
Tombstone Transcriptions in Print (Often more complete)
List of Cemeteries in the County
See South Dakota Cemeteries for more information

Census Records[edit | edit source]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1910 8,323
1920 11,970 43.8%
1930 12,712 6.2%
1940 9,937 −21.8%
1950 9,139 −8.0%
1960 8,761 −4.1%
1970 8,171 −6.7%
1980 7,268 −11.1%
1990 6,924 −4.7%
2000 6,430 −7.1%
2010 5,644 −12.2%
Source: "Wikipedia.org".

Before South Dakota was a state in 1889, parts of South Dakota were included in the 1836 Iowa Territory census (also known as Wisconsin Territory), 1840 Iowa Territory census, 1850 Minnesota Territory census, and the 1860-1880 Dakota Territory censuses.[5] See links listed below.

State Census Records[edit | edit source]

Federal Census Records[edit | edit source]

Federal Censuses were taken for South Dakota starting in 1910. For links to Federal census indexes, see South Dakota Census.

Church Records[edit | edit source]

Church records vary significantly depending on the denomination and the record keeper. They may contain information about members of the congregation, such as age, date of baptism, christening, or birth; marriage information and maiden names; and death date. For general information about South Dakota denominations, view the South Dakota Church Records wiki page.

Court Records[edit | edit source]

Directories[edit | edit source]

Emigration and Immigration[edit | edit source]

Ethnic, Political, and Religious Groups[edit | edit source]

Funeral Homes[edit | edit source]

Genealogies[edit | edit source]

Guardianship[edit | edit source]

Land and Property Records[edit | edit source]

Land and property records can place an ancestor in a particular location, provide economic information, and reveal family relationships. Land records include: deeds, abstracts and indexes, mortgages, leases, grants and land patents.

See South Dakota Land and Property for additional information about early South Dakota land grants. After land was transferred to private ownership, subsequent transactions were usually recorded at the county courthouse, where records are currently housed.

Online Land Records

Local Histories[edit | edit source]

Local histories are available for Tripp County, South Dakota Genealogy. County and town histories may include biographies, church, school and government history, and military information. For more information about local histories, see the wiki page section South Dakota Local Histories.

  • Rootsweb
  • Tripp County Centennial 1909-2009, published by Winner Chamber of Commerce Centennial History Committee, 480 pages; history of Tripp County; many biographies of area families.
  • Businesses in Winner, SD from 1910 - 2008, A Tripp County Centennial Project, Keo Boreson, Compiler, August 2009; history of each business building on Main Street of Winner, SD and change of ownership and type of business, 200 pages
  • Our Roots are in Wewela, Helen Turnquist, Compiler; 2009; History and maps of Wewela, SD; many old pictures of town, church and school; biographies of families in area; 195 pages
  • Colome, SD Diamond Jubilee, 1908-1983, Diamond Jubilee Book Committee, Frances Jorgenson, Chairman, 207 pages. History of Colome: Naming of Colome, Churches, Organizations, Schools, and Business. Includes large section of biographies of families of area and many pictures of town and people.
  • Before Homesteads in Tripp County and the Rosebud, by Gladys Whitehorn Jorgensen. 138 pages. Excellent early history of Tripp County area along with biographies of very early families and prominent Native Americans in the area. Many pictures and maps.
  • Fifty years in the Rosebud country of South Dakota. 1954. By William McDonald. Gregory, South Dakota : The Times-Advocate. Online at: [URL Hathitrust], [URL Internet Archive], [URL Google Books], [URL Ancestry-($)]; At various libraries (WorldCat).
  • The History of Tripp County, South Dakota. 1984. By Diamond Jubilee History Committee. [Winner, South Dakota] : Winner Chamber of Commerce, Diamond Jubilee History Committee. Online at: [URL Hathitrust], [URL Internet Archive], [URL Google Books], [URL Ancestry-($)]; At various libraries (WorldCat).
  • Pioneer career women of Tripp county, South Dakota. 1993. By Florence Hedlund. Salt Lake City, Utah : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah. Online at: [URL Hathitrust], [URL Internet Archive], [URL Google Books], [URL Ancestry-($)]; At various libraries (WorldCat).
  • Pioneering in the Rosebud. 19--?. By Le Arlie Barry. S.l. : s.n. Online at: ; At various libraries (WorldCat).

Maps and Gazetteers[edit | edit source]

Migration[edit | edit source]

Military Records[edit | edit source]

Civil War

World War I


Naturalization and Citizenship[edit | edit source]

Newspapers[edit | edit source]

For more information, see South Dakota Newspapers.

South Dakota Newspapers Online

South Dakota Newspaper Catalogs

  • U.S. Newspaper Directory, 1690-Present on Chronicling America - contains a list of all known newspapers and the dates they cover; once you locate a newspaper name, contact the local library to see if they have copies of the newspaper.

Additional newspapers abstracts can sometimes be found using search phrases such as Tripp County, South Dakota Genealogy newspapers in online catalogs like:

Obituaries[edit | edit source]

Other Records[edit | edit source]

Periodicals[edit | edit source]

Probate Records[edit | edit source]

In most counties in South Dakota, probate records have been kept by the county judge. They include wills, fee books, claim registers, legacy records, inheritance records, probate ticklers, and dockets. The records are available at the county courthouse.

The FamilySearch Catalog lists films of probate records. To find the records for this county, use the Place Search for South Dakota, Tripp then click Probate records.

Online Records

School Records[edit | edit source]

Tax Records[edit | edit source]

South Dakota tax records complement land records and can be used to supplement the years between censuses. There may be gaps of several years in the records.

Vital Records[edit | edit source]

Vital Records consist of births, adoptions, marriages, divorces, and deaths recorded on registers, certificates, and documents. See the CDC Where to Write website for information on acquiring copies of these records.

Birth[edit | edit source]

Marriage[edit | edit source]

Death[edit | edit source]

Divorce[edit | edit source]

Research Facilities[edit | edit source]

Archives[edit | edit source]

Family History Centers[edit | edit source]

Family History Centers provide one-on-one assistance and free access to premium genealogical websites. In addition, many centers have free how-to genealogy classes.

Libraries[edit | edit source]

Museums[edit | edit source]

Societies[edit | edit source]

Websites[edit | edit source]

Research Guides[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 The Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America,10th ed. (Draper, UT:Everton Publishers, 2002).
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tripp_County,_South_Dakota accessed 2/1/2017
  3. The Handybook for Genealogists : United States of America, 10th ed., (Draper, UT: Everton Publishers, 2002)Tripp County, South Dakota, p.628
  4. Wikipedia contributors, "Tirpp County, South Dakota," in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia,https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tripp_County%2C_South_Dakota accessed 7 November 2016.
  5. ’'Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), 617. At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.