Algeria Church Records

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For information about records for non-Christian religions in Algeria, go to the Religious Records page.

Online Resources and Websites[edit | edit source]

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

Islam is the predominant religion in Algeria, with its adherents, mostly Sunnis, accounting for 99% of the population according to a 2012 CIA World Factbook estimate, and 97.9% according to Pew Research in 2010. In the early 1980s, the Roman Catholic population numbered about 45,000, most of whom were foreigners or Algerians who had married French or Italians. A 2015 study estimates some 380,000 Christian believers from a Muslim background in the country, most of whom subscribe to some form of evangelical Christianity. The Protestant Church of Algeria is one of only two officially recognized Christian organizations in the country. Algeria is included in the episcopal area of North Africa of the Anglican Diocese of Egypt. [1]

Information Recorded in the Records[edit | edit source]

Different denominations, different time periods, and practices of different record keepers will effect how much information can be found in the records. This outline will show the types of details which might be found (best case scenario):

Baptisms[edit | edit source]

In Catholic and Anglican records, children were usually baptized a few days after birth, and therefore, the baptism record proves date of birth. Other religions, such as Baptists, baptized at other points in the member's life. Baptism registers might give:

  • baptism date
  • the infant's name
  • parents' names
  • father's occupation
  • status of legitimacy
  • occasionally, names of grandparents
  • names of witnesses or godparents, who may be relatives
  • birth date and place
  • the family's place of residence
  • death information, as an added note or signified by a cross

Marriages[edit | edit source]

Marriage registers can give:

  • the marriage date
  • the names of the bride and groom
  • indicate whether the bride and groom were single or widowed
  • their ages
  • birth dates and places for the bride and groom
  • their residences
  • their occupations
  • birthplaces of the bride and groom
  • parents' names (after 1800)
  • the names of previous spouses and their death dates
  • names of witnesses, who might be relatives.

Burials[edit | edit source]

Burial registers may give:

  • the name of the deceased
  • the date and place of death or burial
  • the deceased's age
  • place of residence
  • cause of death
  • the names of survivors, especially a widow or widower
  • deceased's birth date and place
  • parents' names, or at least the father's name



How to Find Records[edit | edit source]

Digital Copies of Church Records in the FamilySearch Catalog[edit | edit source]

Watch for digitized copies of church records to be added to the collection of the FamilySearch Library. Some records might have viewing restrictions, and can only be viewed at a Family History Center near you, and/or by members of supporting organizations. To find records:

a. Click on the records of Algeria.
b. Click on Places within Algeria and a list of towns will appear.
c. Click on your town if it appears, or the location which you believe was the parish which served your town or village.
d. Click on the "Church records" topic. Click on the blue links to specific record titles.
e. Some combination of these icons will appear at the far right of the listing for the record. FHL icons.png. The magnifying glass indicates that the record is indexed. Clicking on the magnifying glass will take you to the index. Clicking on the camera will take you to an online digital copy of the records.

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

You will probably need to write to or email the national archives, the diocese, or local parish priests to find records. See French Letter Writing Guide for help with composing letters.

Anglican (Episcopal) Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

The Church of the Holy Trinity, Algiers
Eglise Anglicane Episcopale de la Sainte Trinité
6 Avenue Souiddani Boudjemaa
BP 122K El-Mouradia
Algiers, Algeria

Church: +213 (0) 21 681 719
Home: +213 (0) 21 230 591
Mobile: +213 (0) 781 306 726
E-mail: info@holytrinityalgiers.org

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

There is only one current congregation in the country, Holy Trinity Anglican Church, in Algiers.[2]

Catholic Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing to a Local Parish[edit | edit source]

Earlier records can be held at the diocese, with more recent records still kept in the local parish. To locate the mailing address or e-mail address for a diocese or local parish, consult:

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

The Roman Catholic Church was reintroduced after the French conquest, when the Diocese of Algiers was established in 1838. The several Roman Catholic missions established in Algeria were concerned with charitable and relief work; the establishment of schools, workshops, and infirmaries; and the training of staff for the new establishments. Some of the missionaries of these organizations remained in the country after independence, working among the poorer segments of the population. During French colonial rule, the Catholic population of Algeria peaked at over one million, but most of these left following Algeria's independence in 1962. In the early 1980s, the Roman Catholic population numbered about 45,000, most of whom were foreigners or Algerians who had married French or Italians. [3][4]

Protestant Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

Protestants are a religious minority in Algeria. The small Christian community generally practices its faith without government interference. The Protestant Church of Algeria is one of only two officially recognized Christian organizations in the country. The Protestant Church of Algeria (EPA French: Eglise protestante d'Algérie) is a federation of Protestant churches from the Reformed and Methodist traditions established in 1972 in Algeria. It is officially recognised by the government of Algeria as the Association of the Protestant Church of Algeria (French: Association de l'Eglise protestante d'Algérie). While exact numbers are not precise, estimates of members range from 100,000 to 150,000 in about 40 to 50 parishes nationwide, primarily in the northern coastal region of the country.[5]

Protestantism was present in Algeria from the early years of French colonization. The first synod of Reformed churches was held in 1843, and Methodists began their work in North Central Algeria (Bougie) in 1883, under the inspiration of the French Methodist Church, and organized in annual conferences (according to linguistic affinities). Many other denominations or missions have also served in Algeria, including the Adventists, Anglicans, Baptists, Mennonites, Pentecostals, and others. The association as it exists today, which takes the form of a federation of communities, was founded in 1972 by the coming together of the United Methodist and French Reformed communities in Algeria. At about the same time, the Mennonite, Salvation Army, and Church of God communities disappeared, and their members were incorporated into the Protestant Church of Algeria. Adventists and Anglicans exist alongside (and outside of) the Protestant Church.[6]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Wikipedia contributors, "Religion in Algeria", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_Algeria, accessed 15 March 2020.
  2. Wikipedia contributors, "Protestantism in Algeria", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protestantism_in_Algeria, accessed 15 March 2020.
  3. Wikipedia contributors, "Religion in Algeria", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_Algeria, accessed 15 March 2020.
  4. Wikipedia contributors, "Catholic Church in Algeria", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catholic_Church__in_Algeria, accessed 15 March 2020.
  5. Wikipedia contributors, "Protestant Church of Algeria", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protestant_Church_of_Algeria, accessed 15 March 2020.
  6. "Protestant Church in Algeria", World Council of Churches, https://www.oikoumene.org/en/member-churches/protestant-church-of-algeria, accessed 15 March 2020.