Afghanistan Finding Town of Origin

From FamilySearch Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Afghanistan Wiki Topics
Flag of Afghanistan.svg.png
Beginning Research
Record Types
Afghanistan Background
Local Research Resources
Afghanistan Finding Town of Origin

Finding the Town of Origin[edit | edit source]

In order to research your family in their "old" country, it is essential that you have identified the place where they came from. You must know the city, town, or parish that they came from.

Important Tips[edit | edit source]

You must also know enough about the ancestor to positively identify him in the records. Dates (even if they are approximate), places, and familial connections are key to helping you decide if a person you find, who has the same name as your ancestor, really is your ancestor.

  • Do you know the name of his/her parents?
  • Do you know his/her birth, marriage, or death date or can you calculate an approximate range of years to search for his/her birth, marriage, or death?
  • Do you know the name of the spouse? Did they marry before or after coming to the United States?
  • Do you know the names of any of his/her siblings?
  • Do you know the names of any children born in before the family emigrated?

Search Home Sources[edit | edit source]

Thoroughly go over all home sources available to you, including family history papers, copies of records, pictures, old letters (i.e. with an old address), family bibles, journals/diaries, copies of vital record certificates and church records, memorabilia etc. Interview extended family and close relatives as well as former neighbors--all of which may prove very helpful in gathering as much knowledge about an ancestor as possible.

Emigration Questions to Ask Relatives[edit | edit source]

Find the oldest living relatives that you can and ask them:

  1. What do you know about our first ancestor to immigrate? (open-ended)
  2. Have you ever heard mention of towns in Afghanistan where the family lived?
  3. Do you have contact with any relatives in Afghanistan?
  4. Do you have contact with other branches of the family in other countries?
  5. When _____________ came from Afghanistan, did he travel with other family members?
  6. Do you know when _________________ arrived and which port city?
  7. Did _______________ever become a citizen?
  8. Did_________________fight in World War I or II?
  9. When they first came, were there already family members here who they joined?
  10. Did_______________ever mention their parents in Afghanistan?
  11. Were they Catholic?
  12. Do you have any old letters or postcards from Afghanistan family?
  13. Do you have any pictures of family members in Afghanistan?

Search Genealogies Compiled by Others[edit | edit source]


Records of the Country of Destination[edit | edit source]

  • Church Records: If your ancestor immigrated to a European or a South American/Hispanic country, church records can be detailed enough to identify a former residence or birthplace in the home country. These countries, unlike the United States, had state churches. In many countries, these state churches were used by the country to keep birth, marriage, and death records. Even though your ancestor was born in his former country, he may have married, and certainly died in his new country. Marriage and death records can state birthplace.
  • Civil Registration: Eventually, most governments began keeping birth, marriage, and death records. These tend to be quite detailed. Again, if your ancestor was possibly married and certainly died in their new country, those records can state birthplace.
  • Citizenship Records: If your ancestor became a full citizen, those records probably name birthplace and former residence.
  • Online Genealogy Records: See Online Genealogy Records by Location and find the online genealogy record page for your country to see other indexed collections that can be consulted.

Records to Search Created in the United States[edit | edit source]